Due to heavy rain in the immediate forecast, the Midvalley Elementary groundbreaking ceremony has been rescheduled for Wednesday, April 17.

The public is invited to the event, which had previously been scheduled for this Tuesday. As previously planned, it will start with a reception at 5:30 p.m. followed by the ceremony at 6 p.m.

There are a lot of reasons to rebuild Midvalley Elementary. Built in 1957, the school is Canyons District’s oldest campus. It opened the same year as the historic launch of the world’s first unmanned satellite Sputnik, a full decade before dot matrix printers were invented, and at a time when the latest teaching tool was an overhead projector. Cleaning chalkboard erasers was regarded a privilege, and duck-and-cover drills were the staple of school safety plans.

But on Wednesday, April 17, as the community breaks out the shovels and hard hats for a groundbreaking ceremony to mark the start of the new school’s construction, Principal Tamra Baker is insistent that “in embracing our future, we honor our past.” 

The modernized building will be safer, more energy-efficient, and better able to support today’s teaching technologies. It’s also being built with Midvale’s growing population in mind to accommodate nearly double the number of students it serves now.

“I can’t tell you how much this rebuild means to our community, to our students, parents, teachers, neighbors and alumni,” says Baker. “Midvalley has a wonderful culture and history, and as a school community, we are going to plant that heart and spirit in every tree, bush and brick. We are really excited about this new building.”

Midvalley is the first elementary school to be rebuilt with proceeds from a $283 million bond approved by voters in November, 2017. It was chosen due to its advanced age, and need for seismic improvements and roof repairs. The new school will be built onsite while students continue to attend the old school.

NJRA Architects designed the new building, and crews with Bud Mahas Construction will start their work this spring. The new school is expected to open for the 2020-2021 school year.

“School staff collaborated on the design, and the architects found a way to bring their vision to life,” says Baker. Skylights and glassed-in walls allow natural light to filter throughout the building. Collaborative space within and outside classrooms will support team-teaching and group learning. The school features a large gymnasium, high-tech media center, and large cafeteria.

No detail has been overlooked. All that’s missing, in fact, is a stand-alone computer lab, which faculty agreed wasn’t necessary, since the school is well on its way to having one computing device for every student in every classroom. “We are high-tech’ing it all the way throughout the building,” Baker says.
There are a lot of reasons to rebuild Midvalley Elementary.

Built in 1957, the school is Canyons District’s oldest campus. It opened the same year as the historic launch of the world’s first unmanned satellite Sputnik, a full decade before dot matrix printers were invented, and at a time when the latest teaching tool was an overhead projector. Cleaning chalkboard erasers was regarded a privilege, and duck-and-cover drills were the staple of school safety plans.

But on Tuesday, April 16, as the community breaks out the shovels and hard hats for a groundbreaking ceremony to mark the start of the new school’s construction, Principal Tamra Baker is insistent that “in embracing our future, we honor our past.” The event kicks off at 5:30 p.m. with a public reception, followed by a ceremony, which will begin promptly at 6 p.m.

The modernized building will be safer, more energy-efficient, and better able to support today’s teaching technologies. It’s also being built with Midvale’s growing population in mind to accommodate nearly double the number of students it serves now.

MidvalleyRendering“I can’t tell you how much this rebuild means to our community, to our students, parents, teachers, neighbors and alumni,” says Baker. “Midvalley has a wonderful culture and history, and as a school community, we are going to plant that heart and spirit in every tree, bush and brick. We are really excited about this new building.”

Midvalley is the first elementary school to be rebuilt with proceeds from a $283 million bond approved by voters in November, 2017. It was chosen due to its advanced age, and need for seismic improvements and roof repairs. The new school will be built onsite while students continue to attend the old school.

NJRA Architects designed the new building, and crews with Bud Mahas Construction will start their work this spring. The new school is expected to open for the 2020-2021 school year.

“School staff collaborated on the design, and the architects found a way to bring their vision to life,” says Baker. Skylights and glassed-in walls allow natural light to filter throughout the building. Collaborative space within and outside classrooms will support team-teaching and group learning. The school features a large gymnasium, high-tech media center, and large cafeteria.

No detail has been overlooked. All that’s missing, in fact, is a stand-alone computer lab, which faculty agreed wasn’t necessary, since the school is well on its way to having one computing device for every student in every classroom. “We are high-tech’ing it all the way throughout the building,” Baker says.
As the sun sets on Midvalley Elementary's 60th year, a new dawn arises for the Junior Huskies.

Built in 1957 when a piece of candy cost .5 cents, frisbees were all the rage, and most of the area surrounding the school was farmland, Midvalley now serves a diverse and growing suburban population, and is in need of an upgrade—which it will soon be getting when it’s rebuilt with proceeds from a $283 million, voter-approved bond.

No time is being wasted on the project, the first of four elementary schools to be constructed with the bond funds. NJRA Architects have been busy designing the new, two-story school with input from teachers, students, and patrons. Families and neighboring homeowners were invited to preview the preliminary plans this past week. 

Small180926 KG PlaygroundThe architects intend to use a similar design to that deployed in other communities, which saves taxpayer funds. The plans include large skylights that allow for natural light to reach all floors, technologically-equipped classrooms, a brightly-colored kindergarten playground, and a faculty lounge that opens onto an outdoor courtyard. small180926 Faculty Patio

Safety is a big factor in the design and great care will be taken to situate the building in such a way as to provide administrators with a clear view of entrances and exits while also making it easy for emergency responders to access the campus. The new school will have a security vestibule that will require all visitors to be seen by school staff before they enter the building. In addition, the building will be equipped with state-of-the-art mechanical and electrical systems and voice amplification equipment for teachers in the classroom.

The building will be built on the southeastern edge of the campus so as to minimize disruptions for students and allow them to stay in the existing school building during construction.

Crews are anticipated to break ground this coming spring, and the projects is expected to be completed in time for the 2020-2021 school year.



 
In 1957 when Midvalley Elementary was built, a piece of candy cost .5 cents, frisbees were all the rage, and most of the area surrounding the school was farmland.

The home of the junior huskies started as an eight-classroom schoolhouse, and every December the Midvale community would decorate the length of the building with ceramic lights and holiday murals, says the school’s Principal Tamra Baker. “They called it Candy Stick Lane. It was like a ZCMI [department store] Christmas.”

Today, the school serves a diverse and growing suburban population, and is in need of an upgrade, which it will soon be getting when it’s rebuilt with proceeds from a $283 million, voter-approved bond — but not before the community gets a chance to say farewell to the schoolhouse that has served them so well.
edgemont.jpg Midvalley is one of two CSD schools turning 60 this year. Edgemont Elementary also is celebrating its diamond jubilee. The home of the Eagles serves White City, which also will be receiving a new school as part of the 2017 bond. Both schools will be hosting birthday celebrations in the coming weeks to which current and former employees and students, parents and the community are invited (see details below).

If walls could talk, these schools would, no doubt, have stories to tell of generations past. They might recall the creation of NASA and ensuing influx of federal funding for science and math instruction triggered by America’s race to space. Maybe they’d exchange anecdotes about the open-classroom designs in vogue during the sixties and seventies, the desegregation movement, the push for the equitable treatment of students with disabilities, and the rise of vocational education.

“I think we’re one of the last schools with a civil defense bomb shelter,” Midvalley’s Baker says. “We still have radiator hemidvalleyflyer.jpgat. The old boiler was called the gray dragon, and when they put in a new one, the custodian named it the little blue mule.”

Facility upgrades may breathe new life into schools and the communities they serve, but they don’t erase the memories of those who have taught and learned there, says Edgemont Principal Cathy Schino.

Come see old friends, pictures and scrapbooks, share some memories, and enjoy some food at these 60th birthday celebrations:

Edgemont Elementary, 1085 E. 9800 South
Enjoy food, auctions, games, and more during the school's 9th Annual Grand Event on Friday, May 18, 5-8 p.m. The school’s annual fundraising will mark the school’s 60th anniversary.

Midvalley Elementary, 217 E. 7800 South
Enjoy food, a piece of birthday cake and student performances while getting a sneak peek at the school's new logo at a birthday celebration held to coincide with Midvalley’s Multicultural Fair on Wednesday, May 30, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
CSD is launching the 2015-2016 school year with a focus on academic success — and student safety.

Security-door vestibules will be installed in 14 elementary schools beginning this fall. The project, scheduled for a December 2016 completion, will channel visitors into each school's main office, where they will need to sign in and receive a visitors badge before they are able to access to the school.

The project, fast-tracked by the Board of Education last March, provides a welcoming entrance as well as direction for visitors. It allows building administrators to provide additional safety to students, staff, and visitors, and ensures a more energy-efficient entrance for each CSD elementary school. It also reinforces
CSD's current practices, rooted in state law, to require all visitors to sign in and sign out with the school's front office staff.

The $1.5 million project ensures the placement of security vestibules in all 29 elementary schools. The project had been budgeted over a three-year interval, and scheduled for a 2017 completion. The Board in March 2015 voted to advance the completion date to December 2016. Security vestibules have been installed at 13 elementary schools to date. Two more elementary schools – Butler and Alta View – will have security vestibules when those buildings are rebuilt with the $250 million in voter-approved bonds and open in fall 2016 and fall 2017, respectively.

Work will begin in October on the first nine projects, which are: Bella Vista, Canyon View, Quail Hollow, Peruvian Park, East Sandy, Bell View, Edgemont, Willow Canyon and Crescent elementaries. Construction on projects at Ridgecrest, Midvalley, Lone Peak, Sprucewood and Altara elementaries is to begin in spring 2016.
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