Five of CSD’s talented high school instrumentalists have been selected to perform with the Utah Symphony at an All-Star Evening Concert on Tuesday, May 23.

The rare honor is granted to 57 students statewide. At the 7 p.m. event at Abravanel Hall, students will perform Dvorak’s Violin Concerto side-by-side with their professional counterparts. The performance will last two hours and admission starts at $12.

The following students were chosen based on their performance at the Utah Symphony Youth Orchestra Festival on March 13, 2017:

Sean Dulger, Horn, Corner Canyon
Laura Lee, Violin, Corner Canyon
Micah Clawson, Violin, Hillcrest
Dallin Davis, Cello, Hillcrest
Parker Kreiger, Clarinet, Hillcrest

Do the winter blues have you down? Would you rather disappear into Victorian England, consider the value of individuality, laugh about society’s pitfalls, pretend you are at the Globe Theatre or spy on the Salem witch trials from the comfort of a high school auditorium? Never fear, Canyons’ students are hard at work on this year’s lineup of Winter-Spring plays — and they’re ready to transport you to your destination of choice.

From “Hamlet” to “Urinetown,” each of Canyons’ high schools — and several middle schools — will be presenting a variety of musicals and plays beginning later this month.

“Our goal is to create a unique version of the world’s most famous play that will cause audiences to realize they can understand Shakespeare,” says the award-winning Hillcrest d16425746_3878946570826_6174560334808074503_n.jpgrama teacher Josh Long. Hillcrest’s production will feature three different versions of Shakespeare’s original script for a streamlined performance, transported into a modern setting, with digital screens surrounding the audience.

Long chose to present “Hamlet” as an additional challenge to his students, who are already four-time Shakespeare Competition champions and four-time State Champions.

Here is a rundown of CSD's theatrical productions:
  • Alta: The Crucible, 7 p.m. Feb. 22-25 @ Alta auditorium
  • Jordan High: Jane Austen’s “Emma,” 7 p.m. March 2-4, 6 @ Jordan auditorium
  • Hillcrest: Hamlet, 7 p.m., March 17-18, 20 @ Hillcrest auditorium
  • Corner Canyon: Urinetown, 7 p.m. May 17-20 @ Corner Canyon auditorium
Middle school performances: 
  • Draper Park Middle: The Lion King Jr. 7:30 p.m. March 7-11
  • Mt. Jordan Middle: Fame! Jr. 7 p.m. May 12, 16-18
For those who doubt regular exercise keeps the brain sharp, consider Exhibit A: CSD’s Academic All-State honorees.

The Utah High School Activities Association’s Academic All-State Award is given to students who excel in the classroom as well as on the court, or in the pool. Four CSD winter athletes were recognized for the 2016-2017 school year:

4A Boys Basketball, GPA 4.0
Ammon Savage, Corner Canyon

5A Girls Swimming, 3.999 GPA
Haley Wiese, Jordan

5A Boys Swimming, 3.999 GPA
Todd Oldham, Jordan

4A Boys Swimming, GPA 4.0
Alvin Tsang, Hillcrest

These athletes boast a combined average GPA of 3.999, and they bring to 23 the total number of CSD’s All-State honorees in 2016.    
They’re blocking their scenes, rehearsing their lines and putting the final touches on stage designs. In the coming weeks, CSD’s high school drama departments will debut the year’s fall theatre productions — a diverse lineup offering a little something for everyone.

Following are production times and dates. Please address any questions to the individual schools.


Jordan High
“Once Upon a Mattress”
November 10-12 and 14 at 7 p.m. in the Auditorium
This musical comedy is a fun-filled parody of the fairy tale, “The Princess and the Pea” with a large chorus, opening the theatre experience to a broad range of students. Tickets are $7 and can be purchased at the door or in Jordan’s Main Office.

Alta High
“Music Man”
November 17-19 and 21 at 7 p.m. in the Auditorium
Alta's Drama Department will be performing another classic with a large chorus, “Music Man," which students have been practicing for months. Tickets are $8.25 in advance at the school’s main office or $9 at the door.

Hillcrest High
“Mary Poppins”
November 17, 18, 19 and 21 at 7 p.m. in the Auditorium
It’s practically perfect in every way. This Broadway version of a children’s classic is an upbeat crowd-pleaser for the whole family. Tickets are $8-10 and are on sale now at the school’s online box office.  

Corner Canyon High
“West Side Story”
November 17-21 at 7 p.m. in the Auditorium
This musical, a loose retelling of Romeo and Juliet set on the gang-torn streets of New York, is a cautionary tale about the dangers of intolerance and prejudice and a reminder of the enduring need for empathy and kindness. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased at the door or online, starting November 7.
Before anything, Alexander Graham Bell once said, preparation is the key to success. It took more than 120 hours of preparation time for Corner Canyon High Aaron Jackson, but the hard work certainly has paid off.

The junior recently received word he earned a perfect 36 composite score on the ACT, the most commonly accepted U.S. college entrance exam.

This summer, as other students lounged by the pool or went boating at the lake, Jackson pulled out his books to bone up for his maiden attempt at the exam. He estimates he studied three hours a day for the English, math, reading and science sections of the rigorous test. “I wouldn’t say that I was 100 percent expecting” a perfect score, Jackson says, “but I was hoping. It was my goal."

His father woke him up at about 5 a.m. on the day the scores were released so the they could check the results. “We had to reload the page a few times to make sure I was seeing it right,” he said. His parents were ecstatic. He kept his enthusiasm checked so he didn’t wake his siblings.

Since the news spread in the community, his cross-country team has given him high-fives, fellow students offered their congratulations — and, he says, his parents have been a little more lenient on time spent hanging out with his buddies. He doesn’t plan to take the test again — “I mean, I can’t get any higher," he says — but he’s put into place a solid academic pathway that may lead him to one of the colleges of his choice.

This year alone, for example, he’s enrolled in five Advanced Placement courses. “I like learning,” he says. “I take the classes because they are enjoyable to me.”

The schools on his short list: Harvard, Yale and Stanford. Now that he has earned a sterling score, he’s sharpening up his college application.

On average, less than one-tenth of 1 percent of all test-takers earns the top score. In the class of 2016 that took the test, only 2,235 of the 2.1 million who sat the exam earned a composite score of 36. The ACT consists of tests in English, mathematics, reading and science, each scored on a scale of one to 36.

A student's composite score is the average of the four test scores. Some students also take the optional ACT writing test, but the score for that test is reported separately and is not included within the ACT composite score. ACT test scores are accepted by all major U.S. colleges. Exceptional scores of 36 provide colleges with evidence of student readiness for the academic rigors that lie ahead.
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