Did you know there are more jobs in the trades—carpentry, electrical, plumbing, and welding—than there trained Utahns to fill them?

Construction, along with the health and personal care industries, will account for one-third of all new jobs in the U.S. through 2022, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Many of these jobs pay above Utah’s median wage, and through the Canyons Technical Education Center (CTEC), it’s possible for students to graduate from high school with the certifications and professional licenses needed to land one.

Such was the prevailing message behind CTEC’s “Connect to the Tech” event on June 18, a free open house showcase of all the Career and Technical Education programs that CTEC has to offer. Middle-school-aged students toured the center on Monday (825 E. 9085 South in Sandy), and were invited to participate in some hands-on learning exercises, from discharging pepper spray at an assailant (criminal justice) to back-boarding someone suspected to have suffered a neck or back injury (emergency responders).

“The cool thing about CTEC is you’re going to earn high school credit and college credit in most of these classes, and for a fraction of the cost of college tuition,” CTE coordinator Benjamin Poulsen told the participants. “One of the things we say is, ‘come start college with us.’”

IMG_6523
IMG_6517
IMG_6516
IMG_6515
IMG_6514
IMG_6506
IMG_6504
IMG_6497
IMG_6493
  • IMG_6523
  • IMG_6517
  • IMG_6516
  • IMG_6515
  • IMG_6514
  • IMG_6506
  • IMG_6504
  • IMG_6497
  • IMG_6493


  • Once seen as an alternative to a college education, training in the skilled trades is now viewed as a good way to get a jump on college, and a career.

    “Last year, most of my students were aspiring electricians, and I had electrical companies offering to pay for their college education,” says CTEC carpentry teacher Tim Kidder, who explained training takes at least two years of college and two years of experience as a journeymen electrician. “They’ll pay for your education and find you work starting at $22 an hour.”

    From there, students can decide to continue with their education and seek a degree in electrical engineering, or launch their careers. Either way, they’re able to land high-paying jobs in interesting fields without accruing lots of college debt. “What an opportunity these kids have, and it’s the same with diesel mechanics, in welding, and in carpentry,” Kidder says.

    CTEC also offers technology-focused programs, including training in the biomedical field, software development, and 3D computer animation. CTEC courses are scheduled throughout the regular school day, and CSD provides students with transportation between their home high schools and the tech center.

    It’s not too late to register for CTEC courses for the 2018-2019 school year, The optimal time to begin thinking about how to fit CTEC classes into school schedules, however, is in the seventh or eighth grades before students register for high school, Poulsen says.

    A full list of programs, and their accompanying certifications and college credit, can be found online or by calling 801-826-6600. But here’s a snapshot:


    CTEC Programs
    Building Construction
    Business Leadership
    Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA)
    Computer Systems
    Computer Programming
    Cosmetology/Barbering
    Criminal Justice
    Digital Media/3D Animation
    Emergency Medical Technician
    Fire Science
    Heavy Duty Mechanics/Diesel
    Medical Assistant
    Medical Forensics
    Nursery Horticulture
    Welding Technician
    It’s no longer referred to as “vocational education” for a reason. Career and Technical Education has gone mainstream.

    Today it’s seen as the path to acquiring the kind of marketable skills needed to succeed in high-paying industries ranging from health care, science and engineering to early childhood education. What's more, those skills are now often taught in tandem with core subjects to boost achievement in literacy, math and history. In fact, 94 percent of high school students take CTE courses, not to mention millions of college-age students.

    Want to know how CTE applies to you and your teenage children? Join us at the South Towne Expo Center on Oct. 25-26 from 8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. for a showcase of CTE training and job opportunities. Co-sponsored by school districts and postsecondary institutions throughout Utah, the event is free and open to the public.

     
    Three Corner Canyon student guitar-makers this summer won international awards and cash prizes at the Freshwood Student Competition at the Association of Woodworking and Furnishing Suppliers (AWFS) convention. The winners are:

    -          Sadie Chidester, first place and $1,000, “Featherprint”

    -          Jacob Rubisch, second place and $500, “Mahogany Gem”

    -          Porter Thorkelson, honorable mention and $250, “Sun Burst.”

    Chidester, Rubisch and Thorkelson are among six students from Corner Canyon, and 19 high school students nationwide, who were selected to compete at Freshwood. The competition was held at the Las Vegas convention in July 2015. The international competition includes high school and college students from the United States and Canada.

    Sadie Chidester - Featherprint
    Jacob Rubisch - Mohagany Gem
    Porter Thorkelson - Sun Burst
  • Sadie Chidester - Featherprint
  • Jacob Rubisch - Mohagany Gem
  • Porter Thorkelson - Sun Burst
  • It's one thing for students in Canyons District to spend their school days working toward being college-and career-ready, but it's quite another when they actually spend a day on the job and learn a little about what the real world is like.  

    That's the experience almost 150 students recently had as they teamed up with 46 local businesses to participate in CSD’s annual Job Shadow Day, the kickoff event of Career and Technical Education Month. Students experienced what it's like to spend a day on the job working in finance, medicine, cancer research, veterinary services, architecture, business management and city planning, to name a few of the opportunities available, then network at a luncheon sponsored by their mentor.

    The experience is aimed at helping students determine what career opportunities appeal to them the most so they can make informed decisions on what kind of schooling, or technical training, will be most beneficial.

    "You don't always get experiences like this, and this is a crucial time to get these ‘inside’ experiences," said Kelsey Smart, a junior at Hillcrest High, who joined Midvale Mayor Joann B. Seghini for an in-depth look at the inner workings of city government. "Not a lot of people get to see what really goes on in local government — that was exciting to me."

    Mentors, like Seghini, also enjoy working with students for a day. It gives potential employers the chance to survey the field of upcoming graduates for a potential new work force, support the community and share their hard-earned wisdom with the next generation.

    "If you feel helpless, you will be," Seghini said as she sat next to Smart at the luncheon. "If you feel empowered, you are. If (students) don’t get out and see what's there they will have no idea what they should be doing. Graduation is just the beginning."

    The good news is, there are many exciting opportunities waiting for students after graduation, said Chet Linton, keynote speaker of the Job Shadow luncheon and president and CEO of the School Improvement Network. According to Linton, by 2018, the amount of students who earn a college degree in order to meet the demands of America's work force will fall short by 3 to 5 million, while at the same time, in 2014, almost half of college graduates under age 25 are out of work or underemployed. The disparity is because students aren't pursing the right careers or the right education to match their desired career, Linton said.

    "We create the life we live — it's up to each of us," Linton said. "I suggest finding things you're passionate about. Ask yourself this question — what are you passionate about? Then do what you love. If you do what you love, you will find something to make you happy."
    Canyons District’s celebration of Career and Technical Education Month starts with CSD’s annual Job Shadow Day.

    Some 100 students will be in Salt Lake County firms on Wednesday, Feb. 4 to learn what it’s like to run a business in our community.

    To be sure, the event kicks off the annual recognition of our Career and Technology Education efforts — and the raised awareness of the role that CTE has in preparing our nation for economic success and workforce competitiveness.

    “The activities planned over the next month will illustrate the rigor and relevance CTE courses offer our students,” said Janet Goble, Canyons District's CTE Director.  “By partnering with the business community, CTE programs are investing in students’ lives with the latest technology and skills that will prepare them to become successful employees as well as future leaders.”

    Check out some videos, found on the District’s YouTube channel, that have produced to promote the District’s CTE offerings.
    In addition, Canyons District is hosting the Utah Association of Career and Technical Education Conference on Friday and Saturday, Feb. 6-7. The UACTE event, the statewide professional-development meeting for CTE educators, will be at Corner Canyon High. More than 1,200 CTE teachers, including 100 teachers from Canyons District, have registered to attend. Goble is spearheading the plans for the conference. 

    Page 1 of 2