As the sun sets on Midvalley Elementary's 60th year, a new dawn arises for the Junior Huskies.

Built in 1957 when a piece of candy cost .5 cents, frisbees were all the rage, and most of the area surrounding the school was farmland, Midvalley now serves a diverse and growing suburban population, and is in need of an upgrade—which it will soon be getting when it’s rebuilt with proceeds from a $283 million, voter-approved bond.

No time is being wasted on the project, the first of four elementary schools to be constructed with the bond funds. NJRA Architects have been busy designing the new, two-story school with input from teachers, students, and patrons. Families and neighboring homeowners were invited to preview the preliminary plans this past week. 

Small180926 KG PlaygroundThe architects intend to use a similar design to that deployed in other communities, which saves taxpayer funds. The plans include large skylights that allow for natural light to reach all floors, technologically-equipped classrooms, a brightly-colored kindergarten playground, and a faculty lounge that opens onto an outdoor courtyard. small180926 Faculty Patio

Safety is a big factor in the design and great care will be taken to situate the building in such a way as to provide administrators with a clear view of entrances and exits while also making it easy for emergency responders to access the campus. The new school will have a security vestibule that will require all visitors to be seen by school staff before they enter the building. In addition, the building will be equipped with state-of-the-art mechanical and electrical systems and voice amplification equipment for teachers in the classroom.

The building will be built on the southeastern edge of the campus so as to minimize disruptions for students and allow them to stay in the existing school building during construction.

Crews are anticipated to break ground this coming spring, and the projects is expected to be completed in time for the 2020-2021 school year.



 
Enthusiastic Indian Hills Middle students cut short their summers to take part in the grand opening of their newly remodeled campus at a ribbon-cutting ceremony held two days before the start of school.

“This newly renovated school is for our students. It’s all for the students,” Principal Doug Graham told the crowd of parents, alumni, teachers and community members who also flocked to see the school’s bright, colorful new interior. “The community was generous enough to provide the funding for this school, and in turn I challenge our students to express their appreciation by dedicating themselves to being the best they can be for every moment they are at Indian Hills Middle.”

If the Warriors, who spent the past year of construction attending classes at the temporary location of Crescent Middle, were eager to return home, the completion of Indian Hills also marks an important milestone for Canyons School District. It is the 13th and final major school improvement project financed with proceeds from a $250 million bond approved by voters in 2010.

In just eight years, the District has rebuilt Alta View and Midvale elementary schools; renovated Albion Middle; built Corner Canyon High and Draper Park Middle; rebuilt Butler and Midvale middle schools, Butler Elementary and Mount Jordan Middle; brought Sandy Elementary up to seismic code; built additions at Hillcrest and Brighton high schools; and installed air-conditioning and heating systems in all schools—all without raising taxes and while maintaining CSD’s AAA bond rating.

For Board of Education President Sherril Taylor—an inaugural member of the Board and lifelong educator who once taught science at Indian Hills—the ribbon-cutting event felt like coming full circle. “It’s an honor to proudly declare that we did everything we said we were going to do,” he said, thanking community members for their support. “When you voted for a bond in 2010, we told you we’d build or renovate 13 schools — and this is the final one. …I have to say that today’s celebration would not be possible without you.”
small.jpg
The renovation was extensive. Among the “as-new” upgrades are: an improved entryway with a security vestibule to enhance safety; a new commons area that is full of natural light and offers a view of the mountains; new classrooms, labs and collaboration spaces; and an expanded kitchen and cafeteria.

Joining students and families in celebrating the new school were Superintendent Dr. Jim Briscoe, Business Administrator Leon Wilcox, Assistant Superintendent Kathryn McCarrie, Rep. LaVar Christensen, R-Draper, representatives from Sandy City and the PTA, and Canyons Education Foundation Board members Suzanne Harrison, Brad Snow, Aaron Metcalfe, and Bill Rappleye.

“What a turnout,” remarked CSD Board member Chad Iverson, “I’ve never seen so many students so excited to get started with school.”



IMG_9889 2
IMG_9889
IMG_9890
IMG_9892
IMG_9897
IMG_9899
IMG_9900
IMG_9923
IMG_9926
IMG_9928
IMG_9940
IMG_9948
IMG_9950
IMG_9974
IMG_9977
IMG_9988
IMG_9989
IMG_9997
IMG_9741
IMG_9756
IMG_9760
IMG_9761
IMG_9771
IMG_9794
IMG_9814
IMG_9821
IMG_9839
IMG_9841
IMG_9844
IMG_9848
IMG_9850
IMG_9860
IMG_9865
IMG_9875
IMG_9876 2
IMG_9876
IMG_9877
IMG_9878 2
IMG_9878
IMG_9879
IMG_9880
IMG_9882
IMG_9884
IMG_9885
IMG_9886
IMG_9887
IMG_9888
  • IMG_9889 2
  • IMG_9889
  • IMG_9890
  • IMG_9892
  • IMG_9897
  • IMG_9899
  • IMG_9900
  • IMG_9923
  • IMG_9926
  • IMG_9928
  • IMG_9940
  • IMG_9948
  • IMG_9950
  • IMG_9974
  • IMG_9977
  • IMG_9988
  • IMG_9989
  • IMG_9997
  • IMG_9741
  • IMG_9756
  • IMG_9760
  • IMG_9761
  • IMG_9771
  • IMG_9794
  • IMG_9814
  • IMG_9821
  • IMG_9839
  • IMG_9841
  • IMG_9844
  • IMG_9848
  • IMG_9850
  • IMG_9860
  • IMG_9865
  • IMG_9875
  • IMG_9876 2
  • IMG_9876
  • IMG_9877
  • IMG_9878 2
  • IMG_9878
  • IMG_9879
  • IMG_9880
  • IMG_9882
  • IMG_9884
  • IMG_9885
  • IMG_9886
  • IMG_9887
  • IMG_9888
  • Hundreds braved the early evening heat Thursday to celebrate the beginning of construction on a complete rebuild of Brighton High School. Parents, alumni, members of the Cottonwood Heights City Council, Canyons District administrators, Brighton’s High’s principal, teachers and members of Canyons’ Board of Education came to celebrate this milestone for the Bengal community with a ceremonial turning of dirt. collagebhsgroundbreaking.jpg

    But most of all, there were students. From the band and cheer squad who performed the school’s Fight Song to the football players who put away the chairs, Brighton’s students filled the air with cheers in eager anticipation for the remake of their campus. “Any decisions we have made about the design of this new school has been with the students in mind,” Brighton Principal Tom Sherwood said. “The physical, emotional and educational welfare of students will always be at the forefront of our decision making.” 

    Brighton High is among three CSD high schools to be rebuilt or remodeled starting this summer with funds from a $283 million bond approved by voters in 2017. The bond will also be used to rebuild three other schools and build one new elementary school in west Draper, as well as school improvement projects. 

    After opening its doors in 1969, Brighton is fast approaching its 50th birthday — but a lot has changed in 50 years. “When this school was built, the state-of-the-art technology was black and white TVs,” Sherwood said. MHTN Architects and builders from Hogan and Associates Construction will use modern techniques to build a new school that is equipped to educate students in a modern age. 

    The new home of the Bengals will be built in phases over three years, starting with construction of a new auditorium, arts and CTE program spaces, where the existing school sits. Throughout the project, workers will be “building a new school on top of the old school, while still having school,” said Canyons Business Administrator Leon Wilcox.

    Space is a premium on the campus, and there will be challenges during the build, most notably limited parking. But Wilcox said when the new school is completed, students and employees will have more parking space than they do now.

    Other design features include a line of sight down the hallways for administrators and capabilities to lock down classrooms with the push of a button, in case of emergency. The school will have large windows and skylights to bring natural light into the commons area and classrooms, with an emphasis on small-group collaboration. Efforts to preserve elements of Brighton’s history are under way, including circular design elements that harken back to the school’s beloved circular halls.  

    Individuals with ideas on the pieces of Brighton’s heritage they would like to save are invited to email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with their thoughts and contributions. So many people have fond memories of the school, said Canyons Board of Education 2nd Vice President Amber Shill. “My own family is very attached to this place. As the mother of four children who have graduated from here, or who will soon attend here, I feel privileged to take part in its future.”

    Over the past half-century, alumni of Brighton have gone on to be accomplished scholars, athletes, government and industry leaders, artists and contributors to their communities. Canyons School District Vice President Nancy Tingey told the crowd she’s confident many more will join them over the coming years. “With the rebuild of the school, future generations of students will build memories here, too. … Whether your children are involved in sports, whether they have an affinity or math or passion for science, they will find in this school a welcoming place to thrive.”

    Members of the community came to show support to the new school. Canyons Superintendent Dr. James Briscoe, Canyons Board of Education President Sherril Taylor, as well as members Steve Wrigley, Clareen Arnold, Mont Millerberg, and Shill and Tingey, who represent the Brighton area and feeder schools, were there, as well as Rep. Marie Poulson, D-Cottonwood Heights, Utah School Board member Katherine Riebe and members of the Canyons Education Foundation.

    “None of this would be possible without your support,” Shill told the audience gathered at the school. “This is possible because of those who had the vision to create this school district and the voters who showed confidence and trust in the Board of Education. This trust is not taken lightly.”

    38910088_10155367600036580_6637782470324387840_o
    38822015_10155367598471580_2489222401762525184_o
    MM (104)
    MM (116)
    MM (96)
    MM (76)
    MM (58)
    38821300_10155367601691580_8645239928092884992_o
    38824955_10155367599141580_5213237617486725120_o
    38802546_10155367597546580_1231103326871879680_o
    IMG_8233
    JO (353)
    JO (345)
    JO (334)
    JO (322)
    MM (274)
    JO (335)
    JO (366)
    MM (195)
    MM (250)
    MM (278)
    MM (158)
    MM (254)
    MM (149)
    MM (120)
    MM (108)
    MM (85)
    MM (78)
    38825381_10155367595316580_4566153781632303104_o
    JO (358)
    38836062_10155367628836580_5372425645395542016_o
    MM (260)
  • 38910088_10155367600036580_6637782470324387840_o
  • 38822015_10155367598471580_2489222401762525184_o
  • MM (104)
  • MM (116)
  • MM (96)
  • MM (76)
  • MM (58)
  • 38821300_10155367601691580_8645239928092884992_o
  • 38824955_10155367599141580_5213237617486725120_o
  • 38802546_10155367597546580_1231103326871879680_o
  • IMG_8233
  • JO (353)
  • JO (345)
  • JO (334)
  • JO (322)
  • MM (274)
  • JO (335)
  • JO (366)
  • MM (195)
  • MM (250)
  • MM (278)
  • MM (158)
  • MM (254)
  • MM (149)
  • MM (120)
  • MM (108)
  • MM (85)
  • MM (78)
  • 38825381_10155367595316580_4566153781632303104_o
  • JO (358)
  • 38836062_10155367628836580_5372425645395542016_o
  • MM (260)
  • For Principal Brian McGill, the long-awaited renovation of Alta High is personal.

    2d9861f7dfa371a841ce6730b641ed6c XLTwenty-seven years ago, he walked the same halls that his students walk today — and he’s thrilled to see how the new additions will add to the culture and climate of the school. "Even as a student, one of the things I loved the most about this school is the sense of tradition and a drive for excellence,” McGill said at a June 7 groundbreaking ceremony to mark the start of construction. “It’s a place that doesn’t settle for second best, whether it’s in the arts, academics or on the athletic field. This is A-Town! It’s how it’s always been — and how it will always be."

    To officially kick off construction, McGill, in front of a cheering crowd gathered for the groundbreaking celebration, hopped in a massive earth-mover and pulled some levers to make a giant steel claw scoop up and dump a bucket of sand. 

    Joining McGill in celebrating the improvement project were members of the Hawks’ student council, drum line, color guard, and cheerleading squad. Also in attendance were parents, alumni, teachers, members of the Canyons Board of Education, Superintendent Dr. Jim Briscoe, other District administrators, Sandy Mayor Kurt Bradburn, Rep. LaVar Christensen, R-Draper, Senate President Wayne Niederhauser, R-Sandy, Rep. Robert Spendlove, R-Sandy, and Canyons Education Foundation Board Members Suzanne Harrison and Greg Summerhays.

    Alta is among the first of several improvement projects to be completed with funds from a 2017 voter-approved bond. Work also starts this summer on rebuilds of Hillcrest and Brighton high schools. A groundbreaking for the Hillcrest project was held on May 31, and a celebration for the beginning of the Brighton project will take place at the school on Thursday, Aug. 9 at 5:30 p.m.

    “With all of our schools, special care is taken to involve students, parents, teachers and the broader community in the planning process,” remarked Board President Sherril H. Taylor. “We take pride in building schools that reflect the communities they serve and that serve those communities well.”

    The Alta High remodel will be completed in phases over two years so as to allow students to stay inside the building. “This is going to be a complex project to do,” said Canyons District’s Business Administrator Leon Wilcox, expressing appreciation for careful attention that VCBO Architects and Hughes Construction have given the project. “We’re basically building a school on top of a school, while holding school. That’s quite a challenge and these guys are going to do it while making sure everything is safe for all involved.”

    Among major additions to take shape during the first phase of construction are a new field house and 1,400-seat Performing Arts Center, which will be configured to capitalize on mountain views. A new commons area will be a space where students can gather to make new traditions. The ceiling of the commons area will be lifted to 35 feet, and the new open space will be illuminated by natural light. Traffic flow will be improved, making it easier for students, employees, and visitors to safely enter and exit the campus. 

    “From day one, the focus of the design has been about creating the best learning environment for our students and a great work environment for teachers,” McGill said. “I hope you’re as thrilled as I am with the plans for the school, which will stand as a testament to our community’s investment in education for at least the next 40 years.”

    See more on Facebook or the Alta High groundbreaking photo album.

    IMG_8859
    IMG_8866
    IMG_8874
    IMG_8885
    IMG_8893
    IMG_8901
    IMG_8905
    IMG_8913
    IMG_8920
    IMG_8727
    IMG_8747
    IMG_8748
    IMG_8768
    IMG_8775
    IMG_8776
    IMG_8789
    IMG_8805
    IMG_8808
    IMG_8818
    IMG_8827
    IMG_8838
    IMG_8842
    IMG_8851
    IMG_8855
    IMG_8723
    IMG_8737
    IMG_8743
    IMG_8748
    IMG_8754
    IMG_8964
    IMG_8983
    IMG_8997
    IMG_9102
    IMG_8691
    IMG_8664
    IMG_8700
  • IMG_8859
  • IMG_8866
  • IMG_8874
  • IMG_8885
  • IMG_8893
  • IMG_8901
  • IMG_8905
  • IMG_8913
  • IMG_8920
  • IMG_8727
  • IMG_8747
  • IMG_8748
  • IMG_8768
  • IMG_8775
  • IMG_8776
  • IMG_8789
  • IMG_8805
  • IMG_8808
  • IMG_8818
  • IMG_8827
  • IMG_8838
  • IMG_8842
  • IMG_8851
  • IMG_8855
  • IMG_8723
  • IMG_8737
  • IMG_8743
  • IMG_8748
  • IMG_8754
  • IMG_8964
  • IMG_8983
  • IMG_8997
  • IMG_9102
  • IMG_8691
  • IMG_8664
  • IMG_8700
  • A new era of great heights is on the horizon for the Alta High Hawks. 

    A groundbreaking celebration to cheer the start of work on a major two-year renovation at Alta High will be Thursday, June 7. All Alta students, teachers, parents, volunteers, alumni, and boosters are invited to the 5:30 p.m. reception and 6 p.m. ceremony at the school, 11055 S. 1000 East. 

    No time has been wasted starting on the major renovation project, which is funded by the $283 million bond voters approved in November. Construction crews have already started site work on the northwest corner of campus where a 1,400-seat performing arts center will be built. By January 2020, the state-of-the-art center is scheduled to be complete and ready for productions.

    Crews also will soon begin work on the Hawk Fieldhouse immediately north of the football stadium. By next summer, Alta students in activities ranging from football to marching band will be able to practice on an turf-covered indoor field. The second-level gallery of the fieldhouse, which will have a 30-foot ceiling, also will feature windows facing the football field so guests can watch Friday Night Lights action out of the chilly fall air.

    In addition to the new performing arts center, the remodel also calls for the construction of a black box theater where the current auditorium is located. Among other upgrades, several offices will be relocated, the ceiling in the commons area will be raised to about 35 feet, and windows will be added on the front of the building and throughout the entrance to bring in an abundance of natural light. A security vestibule will guide visitors to the Main Office before they can gain access to the hallways. 

    A new red, grey and glass façade on the front of the performing arts center will be replicated along the front of the current building, adding to the school’s curb appeal. In addition, a new marquee and electronic sign will be placed at the corner of 11000 South and 100 East to inform the community about Alta High events and student accomplishments. 

    The renovation project is being designed by VCBO Architecture. The general contractor is Hughes Construction.
    Page 1 of 5