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What do you want to be when you grow up? A builder, a baker, or museum curator? An accountant, a barber, or brave fire fighter? How about a doctor, a researcher, or fabulous teacher?

Every year, on the Friday of the first full week of school, Canyons District celebrates Kindergarten College-Readiness Day, a time for our youngest studenkids.jpgts to share their dreams and begin to think about how they might achieve them. Each classroom finds its own way to celebrate. Some invite students to come to school dressed in the fashion of their career of choice. Others host a career-oriented show-and-tell. All students this year received blue bracelets bearing the words, "I will be college-ready. Class of 2030."

As Canyon View kindergarten teacher Carolyn Armstrong remarked to her class, "It's OK to be undecided, to want to do lots of things, or to change your mind." But even at the age 5, she says, it's important for students to begin to understand the pivotal role that education will play in getting them where they want to go.

In Armstrong's class, students' aspirations are limited only by their imaginations. There are a few fire fighters, policemen, teachers, doctors and veterinarians, a future chemist, rockstar, and robotics engineer. And there's Jonathan, who wants to be an inventor so he can invent a star grabber that grabs stars.

"We need all these jobs which is why it's so great that you all want to do different things," Armstrong said.

Students from Canyon View, East Sandy and Sunrise elementary schools celebrate Kindergarten Career and College-Readiness Day

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  • Thursday, 12 January 2017 18:17

    Flipping School Lunch: ‘Play Before Eat’

    Anyone who follows education has probably heard of flipping the classroom, a model that entails having students watch video lectures at home so that they can use classroom time for discussion or group projects. But Canyon View Elementary is taking things a step further and flipping school lunch — joining a small, but growing number of schools across the country that are sending kids off to the playground before inviting them inside to gulp down a carton of milk with their PB&J.

    At Canyon View, the practice has cut food waste in half, because kids work up an appetite and no longer feel rushed to get outside and play, said Principal BJ Weller. “We’ve found it very beneficial to our students. We’re seeing fewer health complaints. They have more energy and seem more focused and willing to learn.”

    Research also has shown that students attending schools with “reverse lunch” schedules make healthier food choices. One study found a 54 percent increase in the consumption of fruit and vegetables.
    CSD is launching the 2015-2016 school year with a focus on academic success — and student safety.

    Security-door vestibules will be installed in 14 elementary schools beginning this fall. The project, scheduled for a December 2016 completion, will channel visitors into each school's main office, where they will need to sign in and receive a visitors badge before they are able to access to the school.

    The project, fast-tracked by the Board of Education last March, provides a welcoming entrance as well as direction for visitors. It allows building administrators to provide additional safety to students, staff, and visitors, and ensures a more energy-efficient entrance for each CSD elementary school. It also reinforces
    CSD's current practices, rooted in state law, to require all visitors to sign in and sign out with the school's front office staff.

    The $1.5 million project ensures the placement of security vestibules in all 29 elementary schools. The project had been budgeted over a three-year interval, and scheduled for a 2017 completion. The Board in March 2015 voted to advance the completion date to December 2016. Security vestibules have been installed at 13 elementary schools to date. Two more elementary schools – Butler and Alta View – will have security vestibules when those buildings are rebuilt with the $250 million in voter-approved bonds and open in fall 2016 and fall 2017, respectively.

    Work will begin in October on the first nine projects, which are: Bella Vista, Canyon View, Quail Hollow, Peruvian Park, East Sandy, Bell View, Edgemont, Willow Canyon and Crescent elementaries. Construction on projects at Ridgecrest, Midvalley, Lone Peak, Sprucewood and Altara elementaries is to begin in spring 2016.